Traditional landing at Canoe Journey

Traditional landing at Canoe Journey

Raven was eager to participate in  a class to create his own canoe paddle in the Native tradition.  The class was for middle school kids but 6th graders were included.  It was held in the tribal woodworking shop and about a dozen kids participated.

They started with a 2×8 inch board of Alaskan yellow cedar.  First they cut out the general shape then they planed and sanded,  working with the teacher to achieve the desired shape.  There were a few variations but most followed the traditional lines.  It took a whole day, with time out for pizza.

After cutting with a saw, the shape was refined with a plane and by sanding

After cutting with a saw, the shape was refined with a plane and by sanding

Irene examines her work

Irene examines her work

The next day they painted.  A couple of the helpers are very artistic and helped create designs. Raven and several others wanted to paint Sea Hawks on their paddles.  The kids stuck to the task and by the end of the second day, each had a traditional paddle to take home.

Paint carefully applied

Paint carefully applied

Raven's paddle after being painted

Raven’s paddle after being painted

The Sea Hawk fans

The Sea Hawk fans

Finishes!

Finished!

Raven hopes someday to participate in the Canoe Journey that transpires each summer when canoes representing the nearby tribal nations visit each other, traveling by traditional canoe.

Raven in a canoe last summer at Elwha camp

Raven in a canoe last summer at the camp for the Lower Elwha Klallam community children